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With the divorce rate being so high, many homes consist of blended families. The bride's mother might be married and plans to bring her new husband and the father is divorced and bringing his new wife. With a regular wedding, the seating can get complicated as it is, but then try to figure out appropriate seating when there are several marriages involved, and things can become overwhelming. Just as there are dos and don'ts for the bride and groom, in relation to the family, you will find specific guidelines as well.

When it is time for the wedding, if the bride's mother and father are divorced and do not have an amicable relationship, the bride should seat whichever parent she is the closest with in the front row along with her husband. If that person is the mother, which is usually the case, the father would then be seated two rows back, located directly behind the maternal grandparents or other direct members of the mother's family.

If the bride's parents are divorced but have a healthy relationship, both parents could sit together in the front row along with their significant others. However, if there is tension between the parents and one or both of the new spouses, the stepparent can choose to sit toward the back or off to the side of the church alone or with a friend. If the parent's are divorced, but one or both are unmarried and not dating, the best option is to seat the mother in the front row next to a close friend or family member.

Another factor that can be confusing is who walks the bride down the aisle. This decision is solely up to the bride. She may choose her father, stepfather, or a close friend or family member. However, if the bride has a good relationship with both, which can be the situation in cases when the mother remarried when the bride was still young, therefore, being equally raised by both the father and stepfather, it might be best to choose a neutral party. In fact, it is perfectly acceptable for the mother to give the bride away. The other option is for the bride to stay with the tradition and have the father do the honor. When at the reception, each set of blended parents should sit at their own table.

The tricky part comes in conveying the decisions. Obviously, neither bride nor groom wants to offend anyone. More than likely, requests or opinions will be heard from each person. Both bride and groom should be polite, listen, and then lovingly express their decisions. In most cases, all parents will honor their request in support of this special day. After all, all parents really want is to see their children happy.

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